To learn more, visit www.wbu.com/bring-birds-back

 

 

 

Wild About Nature? Get Your Yard Certified 

Anyone can create a welcoming haven for local wildlife. In fact, wildlife habitat gardens support twice as much wildlife as conventional lawns and non-native plant gardens. Turning your yard, balcony container garden or work landscape into a Certified Wildlife Habitat to attract birds, butterflies, and other neighborhood wildlife is fun, easy, and can make a lasting difference. Here is what your wildlife habitat should include:
 
Food: Native plants provide food eaten by a variety of wildlife. Feeders can supplement natural food sources.
 
Water: All animals need water to survive, and some need it for bathing or breeding as well.
 
Cover: Wildlife need places to take shelter from bad weather and places to hide from predators or hunt for prey.
 
Places to Raise Young: Wildlife need resources to reproduce, and to protect and nourish their young.
 
Sustainable Practices: Maintain your yard or garden in natural ways to ensure soil, air, and water stay healthy and clean.
 
Certify your space to show your commitment to wildlife. It’s easier than you might think. Wild Birds Unlimited is a Champion Sponsor of the NWF Certified Wildlife Habitat Program.

Learn more on how to certify your wildlife habitat by clicking here,     www.wbu.com/certify-your-yard 

 

Spring and Summer Feeding


Over 100 North American bird species supplement their natural diets with bird seed, suet, fruit and nectar obtained from feeders.

Access to abundant and healthy food supplies is important to birds…regardless of the season. Bird feeders provide a portion of these important nutritional needs for your backyard birds throughout the year.

Birds with access to backyard feeders benefit greatly from their ability to spend less time foraging for food and more time engaging in activities that enhance their health and safety. These activities can include:

Feeders allow breeding birds to spend less time searching for food and more time selecting better nesting sites and constructing higher quality nests. Adults will also have more time available for protecting their nest, eggs and young from predators.

Research studies have shown that birds with access to bird feeders will often lay their eggs earlier than those without feeders. This is significant because earlier broods typically have better rates of survival and fledging success than later broods.

When abundant food is accessible to parent birds, it means that more food is provided to their chicks. This extra nutrition can increase the nestling’s rate of growth and reduce aggression among nest siblings.

Access to bird feeders allow breeding females to spend less time foraging which leads to better protection of eggs from predators, earlier fledging of the nestlings and higher survival rates of the brood.

Birds are very vulnerable to predators while searching for food, the distraction of foraging results in a reduced ability to focus on dangers and threats from predators. Less time spent foraging means more time spent being vigilant in spotting a predator in time to successfully evade it.

Feeding your birds in the summer will not make them too lazy, too dependent or keep them from migrating at the appropriate time. These misconceptions have been dispelled by modern research and observation.

Contrary to popular belief, recent research shows summer to be the most abundant season for birds to visit feeders.

The food and housing we provide can make a significant difference on how well birds will thrive and survive in our own backyards.